Mary Ewart's bPortfolio

Presentation

on October 24, 2014

To be honest, as we were presented this week with all the amazing ways that students can use technology to present in the classroom in ways that are authentic and enriching, my first (and overwhelming) feeling was frustration. There are so many ways to use technology in humanities or science classrooms in ways that make instruction better and learning more valuable for students. My struggle for the entire 11 years I’ve been teaching is how I can bring those things in to a math classroom. It becomes difficult to teach new math concepts without some sort of direct instruction, and then it becomes an issue of time – how do I fit it all in and still allow students to receive the necessary instruction to cover all the content. The more I consider this, the more I come back to the idea that presentations are a synthesis of information. Presentations are used to take information, connect it to other pieces of information, and make it accessible to others. I think the reason I struggle with putting this in to practice in math is because we don’t have a lot of time to allow students to do this.

This path of thinking led me to consider where I could apply this type of synthesis to my classroom in a way that won’t jeopardize the instruction I know is key to student learning in math. The first place I came up with is during review. My Algebra 1 team gives students 2 classroom days for review each unit. Instead of spending a day on a review game of some sort and a day working problems and taking questions, I think I am going to try an experiment. I love the idea of an infographic – and the fact that students can make one using PowerPoint (a tool they are already very comfortable with). For a future unit, I am going to ask students to work on an infographic to cover the important concepts in the unit. I will introduce it at the start of the unit, so that students know it is coming, and can be thinking about/working on it as we go, but I will also give those 2 classroom days over to student work time. I’ll set up a discussion board or wiki on Haiku and have students post and comment on each other’s work (thanks to Sam for such a great idea in class). I found a great blog about using infographics in school particularly with PowerPoint. The second idea I came up with is related to a weekly problem-solving lesson I do each week. Currently students are required to present their solutions using a 5-step writing structure. While I have had huge success with students’ ability to solve problems by teaching this structure, I think changing the response medium at times could enrich this lesson. I’m thinking that after I have taught a few more problem-solving strategies, I could give each student a problem that uses one of the already taught strategies. Students could have a week to work the problem and complete the standard write-up. Then they could use the next week to come up with a way to present to solution. I am thinking a Prezi or Glogster would be a good way to make that happen. Problem-solving is an area in the classroom where I have more flexibility in timing, so adding another week or two to one problem wouldn’t cause stress with then trying to fit the missed curriculum in somewhere else.

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